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What Is SaaS App Development?

SaaS app development has been gaining momentum in recent years. With the proliferation of cloud services, a growing number of developers are taking advantage of these. And the big winner has been the user who can now access powerful applications without a hefty upfront cost. But what does this mean for enterprises and developers considering a SaaS? Below, we delve deeper into the fascinating world of SaaS mobile app development.

1. Understanding SaaS

Back in the 80s and 90s, enterprises and desktop users requiring specific software would have to purchase it in physical form. Many popular software packages came in big boxes and featured thick manuals and one or more floppy disks or CD-ROMs. With online access becoming more common in the 2000s, software distribution switched from physical media to digital downloads.

But over the past decade, users have gradually made the switch from digital downloads to cloud services. Many developers have taken advantage of this proliferating cloud infrastructure and offer their applications as a Software as a Service (SaaS). The main draw of SaaS is that users can access these applications without needing to download them. Since SaaS applications run in the browser, users don’t have to worry about compatibility issues and updates.

And unlike packaged and downloadable software, SaaS users don’t have to pay a steep upfront fee. The majority of SaaS offerings operate under a subscription model and usually offer a free tier. However, one of the key advantages of SaaS is that all data is stored directly on the cloud. Enterprises have extra surety that they won’t lose data due to employee error or neglect. And since cloud services have become so robust and ubiquitous, they’re perfectly suitable for mobile app development.

2. How SaaS App Development Differs

Every developer embarking on SaaS app development should consider how it differs from custom app development. SaaS is a good choice for smaller developers that need to make an impact in the market. It’s easier to attract paying customers with a SaaS with a limited development and marketing budget. Furthermore, it’s usually quicker to deploy a SaaS than a more monolithic application or custom app.

But every paying SaaS user expects constant updates and the introduction of new features that enhance workflow. Thus, developers need to respond quickly by updating their SaaS at a regular cadence. They may also need to upgrade their cloud infrastructure to deal with the additional demand when necessary. Custom app developers usually don’t have these cloud-centric considerations. And they prefer to offer solutions that better integrate with an enterprise’s existing software.

3. How Do SaaS Mobile Apps Scale

SaaS mobile apps scale incredibly well, and it’s a key reason why so many enterprises use them. And given how powerful and robust cloud infrastructure has become, it’s possible to serve millions of users concurrently and continuously. So, any enterprise that plans to grow its business and reach new users should consider deploying SaaS mobile apps.

But how do custom apps hold up to mobile apps in this regard? Well, unless a custom app’s built to handle huge traffic spikes and high computational loads from the get-go, it will struggle to deliver satisfactory results. Furthermore, it becomes challenging to scale a custom app at a later stage.

4. SaaS Mobile Apps Have Limited Integrations

While SaaS mobile apps offer plenty of pros, we should discuss a few of their cons. Most enterprises use several applications for the smooth operation of their day-to-day business processes. Sooner or later, an enterprise will need to integrate all these applications with their flagship SaaS. But most SaaS platforms usually lack all the integrations and APIs to make this possible.

That’s why enterprises that use many applications should consider custom mobile app development. The developer can create integrations for each piece of software and make these work flawlessly. Therefore, enterprises can run all their applications without experiencing downtimes at regular intervals.

5. Maintaining SaaS Mobile Apps

In a general sense, it’s easier to maintain a SaaS mobile app than a custom alternative. However, this doesn’t mean that the SaaS solution is always ideal. Think long and hard about all the updates and upgrades that you’ll need in the foreseeable future. And the reason why this is so important is that most SaaS providers only offer a limited amount of updates and upgrades.

It’s never a good idea to have your enterprise applications so dependent on third-party vendors. They can change their roadmap and terms of service (ToS) whenever they like, and these changes can affect your business adversely. With a custom solution, you’ll be future-proofing all your mission-critical applications by ensuring that all updates and upgrades are always implemented when you want them done.

6. Why SaaS App Development Timeline Isn’t Better

Don’t jump into SaaS app development because you’ve heard that it’s faster to implement. While you may save time and money initially, your SaaS may fail if it doesn’t line up with your business needs. Take the time to carefully plan your app and determine whether to go with a custom or SaaS solution. Consider how secure your data system should be, and choose custom app development if you need maximum security.

7. Creating All In One SaaS Mobile Apps

If you’re planning on developing an all-in-one SaaS mobile app, you’ll need to consider a few things. Large, complex applications are difficult to pull off, especially for smaller and inexperienced teams. Furthermore, your SaaS should run flawlessly on a variety of devices. Some users may not have access to a smartphone and may prefer to access your app via a desktop or smart TV. It’s vital to accommodate all these users to ensure the success of your app.

Ensure that your all-in-one SaaS mobile app brings unique and valuable features to the table. And optimize these features so that they provide users a more efficient workflow. Ultimately, you’ll want to give users plenty of reasons to keep using your app over alternatives.

8. How SaaS App Development Affects Business Productivity

The success of SaaS applications largely depends on how well they onboard new users. And every good SaaS should also enhance existing business processes and facilitate productivity. In a best-case scenario, an enterprise should find a SaaS platform that suits its needs.

But every business is different, with its unique challenges, demands, and needs. And it may become difficult to find a SaaS platform that fulfills these needs. Therefore, it’s better to go with a custom solution designed for a specific business. Not only is this a more robust solution, but it can lead to better productivity since the custom app tightly integrates with existing processes and workflows.

9. Main SaaS App Development Issues

Mobile app development always throws a curveball or two, and the same applies to the creation of SaaS apps. Since every SaaS is reliant on the cloud, developers should always prioritize security. They’ll need to take extra care in how they store data and how they authenticate users. Any data losses or security breaches will tarnish the reputation of their SaaS and subsequently lose users.

Developers should also ensure that data synchronizes properly between their mobile and desktop apps. Moreover, calendars, documents, and task lists should synchronize without causing any conflicts or errors. The last thing you want is to frustrate users and ruin their workflow if the apps they use most don’t synchronize or work properly.

In Conclusion

SaaS mobile apps have been growing in popularity in recent years. And while they offer plenty of pros, they’re not always ideal for all enterprises. If your business has unique needs and requirements, you may want to go with a custom solution. Contact us today to learn how NS804 can help you develop versatile apps that solve business problems.

How To Start Your Own SaaS Business

If you’ve been planning on starting a SaaS business, then there’s never been a better time in embarking on such an endeavor. Many SaaS (Software as a Service) enterprises have emerged in the past decade and have successfully left their mark in the industry.

Established tech giants such as Amazon, Google, and Microsoft have made available their own SaaS offerings. And users have been reaping the benefits of accessing these cloud-based applications cheaply and easily. Now, we’ll look further into what it takes to start your own Saas enterprise.

1. The Rise Of The SaaS Enterprise

The internet has radically transformed the way we do business and consume. Enterprises can release powerful apps far quicker than before, while users can access these applications almost effortlessly. And digital distribution has played a vital role in making this possible over the past two decades.

But even digital distribution has its fair share of bottlenecks that impedes the accessibility and evolution of software. In many cases, users have to pay a steep upfront cost and download and install files on their computers. And in the case of freemium or mobile apps, users may not have to pay a cent, but they’ll likely have to watch ads or whip out a credit card to access certain functionality.

Nowadays, users don’t have to relegate themselves to any digital distribution platform to access powerful and useful apps. With the rise of the SaaS enterprise, users can try out web-based solutions directly from their browsers.

So, what exactly is a SaaS enterprise? Well, it’s a company that develops an application or a series of applications meant to solve specific problems. These applications are hosted on a cloud service either by a third-party or on the company’s own servers. In the latter case, the company needs to update and maintain its SaaS applications and hardware. But that’s a boon for end-users since they don’t have to worry about updating their apps. And they no longer have to trawl forums or contact support when an update or installation goes wrong.

We’ve seen that this SaaS business model has been gaining traction in recent years. If you’ve used MailChimp, Slack, or Zoom, then you’ve used a SaaS product. But it won’t end there, as we’re bound to see many trailblazing SaaS enterprises emerge in the coming years.

2. Why You Should Consider Starting A SaaS Business

Whether you’re an appreneur or leading an enterprise, you’re likely coming up with cool and unique ideas. A few of these ideas could be solutions to problems that most people encounter in their day-to-day lives or enhance existing business processes. Either way, for these ideas to come to fruition, they’ll need the right vehicle to drive them forward.

One of the best ways to do this is by starting your own SaaS enterprise. And the good news is that it’s entirely possible with a small investment and a bit of sweat equity. Online marketing expert, Neil Patel, managed to launch his SaaS business based on a call-tracking idea for under $ 40,000. With his organized approach to building web-based businesses, Neil found a designer and a developer, built his product, and then focused on marketing and sales.

While we’re not insinuating that building a SaaS is easy, it’s doable with the right approach. Furthermore, you’ll benefit by establishing an enterprise that’s entirely your own without requiring a substantial investment. And, if your SaaS proves popular, it won’t be difficult sourcing venture capital (VC) to grow your enterprise further.

3. Choose The Right Funding Model

If you want to have maximum control of your SaaS enterprise, you should consider personally funding the entire endeavor. But if bootstrapping isn’t possible, then you could borrow money from friends and family. A word of warning, if you haven’t planned and validated your SaaS idea, you’ll be risking these funds on a project that could potentially fail.

However, if you’ve done your homework by conducting a competitive analysis, creating detailed financial forecasts, writing a lean plan, and validating your idea, then your funding options widen. Now, you’ll be in a position to seek funding from financial institutions, angel investors, and venture capitalists. But you’ll be giving up some control, and your business decisions will have to line up with requirements set by these entities.

4. A SaaS Business Starts With Proper Planning

Every serious entrepreneur draws up a business plan from day one. After all, no financial institution or angel investor will lend money to an enterprise without a business plan. And when building a SaaS, it’s essential to get your ideas on paper as quickly as possible.

However, it’s not necessary to draft a long and complex document initially. Start with a one-page pitch that briefly describes your business, unique value proposition, competitors, target market, sales forecast, expenses, milestones, and schedule. You can go into more detail once you’ve solidified your business model and SaaS proposition.

5. Creating A Minimum Viable Product (MVP)

Determine whether or not users have an interest in your SaaS. Moreover, validate if these users are willing to pay to use your app. Without releasing a full-fledged product, you’ll never know for sure. But by creating an MVP, you’ll be able to quickly gauge if users are genuinely interested in your offering before building a SaaS.

6. Building A SaaS

Ideally, you’ll have talented developers on your team that will help bring your SaaS ideas to life. While you’ll probably do most of your development in-house, you may need to outsource some work. For a smooth collaborative process, it’s always better to work with experienced developers such as NS804.

Be sure to start small and choose the right software development methodology for your project. Then, get a beta version of your SaaS out the door as quickly as possible, and don’t add any unnecessary features before launch.

7. Employing Good UX Design

It’s just as important to have one or more competent designers on your team. After all, your SaaS shouldn’t only run well, but it must also look great! Users expect good UX design from their apps, and you must meet their expectations if your SaaS is to succeed. Your designers will need to have a solid grasp of the five key elements of UX designs, namely: information architecture, interaction design, usability, prototyping, and visual design.

8. Don’t Ignore Custom Development

While your SaaS enterprise may function amazingly on the cloud, this doesn’t mean that you should ignore custom development. Many users will appreciate accessing an offline version of your SaaS that runs natively on their computers or mobile devices. Furthermore, you can provide users with additional features, extended business functions, and improved security with a custom-developed app.

9. Should A SaaS Business Incorporate Custom Development?

Yes, every SaaS enterprise benefits from incorporating custom development. Many business processes require the speed, stability, and security that only a custom-developed native app can provide. And certain visually intensive apps only run well if they have direct access to a device’s CPU and GPU, which may require a custom solution.

In Conclusion

Every appreneur and enterprise should consider building a SaaS if they want to reach new users. While there’ll always be a market for native applications, many users enjoy the accessibility and convenience of today’s SaaS offerings. Contact us today to learn how NS804 can help you get your SaaS business off the ground.

Four Things Your Enterprise App Is Missing

Four Key Components Your Enterprise App Needs

The beautiful thing about baking is that almost all of the recipes already exist. All you have to do, then, is follow the recipe. And with a little patience you’ll then be eating sweet treats and feeling like Betty White in no time. This is the glory of a template. The baker knows the ingredients, knows the ratios, and because of their knowledge they can alter the recipe in other ways. Understanding the key ingredients of a successful enterprise app will help you and your company in updating or developing your enterprise apps.

Designs, Trends, and Visuals

While this may seem a little frivolous, the contrary is true. Having an updated look, feel, and function to your enterprise app is vital to your employees everyday operations. Again, this might seem a little silly at first, but it’s quite logical when examined. Over the course of the last couple decades our brains have become programmed to think and operate in a certain way. As such, leaving enterprise apps outdated forces employees to think in an outdated and inefficient manner. This, in turn, results in a slow and inefficient process within your organization.

Non-Integrated Solutions

This goes hand-in-hand with the point about above about outdated legacy systems. Outdated enterprise apps further hinder your business practices by limiting your ability to integrate them with more modern-day solutions that are common to the modern market. This leaves your company at a significant disadvantage compared to your competitors.

Not only that, but updating your enterprise app to be more compatible with modern day solutions will boost your business. You’ll see an immediate increase in efficiency, as your entire operation will be streamlined and optimized.

Compatibility Across Devices

Compatibility is always a focal point in app development. Making sure that all users, no matter what device they prefer, have unthrottled access to your application is vital, especially in a business setting. This is because, in a remote business context, your employees may have any number of personal devices from which they’re accessing work.

Making sure that your app is accessible from both android and Ios devices is a vital step. You want to make sure that any and all users are able to successfully use your application. Accessibility is a huge piece in that puzzle.

Offline Work Capability

This is another key ingredient to building a successful enterprise app. Sometimes employees need a place to flush out their ideas. Some scratch-paper, so to speak. Including some offline-access functions in your enterprise app will allow users the privacy and freedom they need to work out their latest inventions and innovations. Without the prying eyes of team-members and co-workers.

This also allows for your employees to test out new formats, or try new formulas in their spreadsheets before making them live, or sharing their trials; further allowing the success of each individual in your company.

Wrapping Up

Having a comprehensive and modern enterprise app is now vital for most businesses. Especially in the new remote economy. For more information on developing or updating an enterprise app for your business, visit NS804. NS804 is the premier place for the everyday app developer.

How Much Does Firebase Cost And Should You Use It

Are you mulling over developer-focused questions, such as how much does Firebase cost? We’re well aware of how complex Google’s pricing structure for their flagship development platform can be.

Luckily, many of Firebase’s SDKs are free, and Google even offers a free tier to help you test the waters. And if you need to scale your app, there’s a paid tier that will give you access to the components you need.

While all this seems enticing, you may or may not be convinced whether to use it. Below, we delve deeper into Firebase to help you make an informed decision.

1. What Is Firebase?

Firebase started life in 2011 as a company specializing in development tools. Founding members; Andrew Lee and James Tamplin had previously established another startup called Envolve. At Envolve, they developed a chat service that many developers utilized to pass and sync application data. This occurrence spurred them on to create the Firebase Realtime Database API, which synchronizes data across mobile devices and the web.

In 2012, Firebase raised $ 1.1 million in seed funding from several venture capital firms and a further $ 5.6 million during 2013. The company didn’t rest on its laurels and later released Firebase Authentication and Firebase Hosting. And in October 2014, Google acquired Firebase and expanded its range of products and services.

2. How Much Does Firebase Cost?

The good news is that the cost of Firebase is flexible, which suits startups and enterprises operating on a budget. Google wisely offers developers a free tier dubbed as the “Spark Plan” for their various Firebase products. But do keep in mind that they do place limits on specific products. For example, Authentication services have a limit of 10,000 verification per month. The same services on their “Blaze Plan” paid tier costs $ 0.01 for phone verifications in the US, Canada, and India and $ 0.06 for other countries.

Firebase Realtime Database allows for 100 simultaneous connections, 1 GB stored, and 10 GB per month downloaded on the free tier. However, the Google Firebase cost on the paid tier translates to 200,000 per database, $ 5 per GB stored, and $ 1 per GB downloaded, while multiple databases per project are permitted. For both tiers, A/B Testing, Analytics, App Distribution, App Indexing, Cloud Messaging (FCM), Crashlytics, Dynamic Links, In-App Messaging, Performance Monitoring, Predictions, and Remote Config, are all free.

3. Are There Any Hidden Google Firebase Costs?

Yes, the cost of Firebase varies considerably depending on product and usage. It’s easy for costs to run out of control if you don’t keep an eye on Google Cloud pricing from day one. Moreover, cloud costs also vary widely according to location, which may have massive consequences for your project. As of January 2021, it costs $ 0.036 per 100,000 document reads for Los Angeles on Cloud Firestore. But it costs $ 0.06 per 100,000 document reads in South Carolina and $ 0.042 in Zürich.

Now, we know what you may be thinking. You don’t have the time and inclination to calculate tentative figures right now. Instead, you’d prefer a rough estimation of Cloud Firestore pricing.

Fortunately, Google does provide several handy price examples for your perusal. Expect to pay about $ 12.14 per month for an app with 50,000 installs and 5,000 daily active users. And about $ 292.02 per month for 1 million app installs and 100,000 daily active users, and approximately $ 2951.52 per month for 10 million app installs and 1 million daily active users.

4. What Types Of Apps Can You Create With Firebase?

Firebase’s wide range of components makes it easy to create almost any type of mobile and web app. You can mix and match all these APIs to add the functionality that you need.

Add AdMob and analytics in your upcoming mobile game, authentication and cloud messaging for your e-commerce app, and cloud functionality and storage for your peer-to-peer photo-sharing service. And as your app grows, it’s a relatively simple process to integrate additional Firebase components that your project requires.

5. What Are The Different Firebase Products?

Firebase has split up its product range into three segments: Build, Release & Monitor, and Engage. Carefully consider what products you’ll use when conducting your Google Firebase cost analysis.

Build products include Authentication, Cloud Firestore, Cloud Functions, Cloud Messaging, Cloud Storage, Firebase ML (BETA), Hosting, Realtime Database, and Remote Config.

Release & Monitor products include App Distribution (BETA), Crashlytics, Google Analytics, Performance Monitoring, Remote Config, and Test Lab.

Engage products include A/B Testing (BETA), Authentication, Crashlytics, Cloud Messaging, Dynamic Links, Google Analytics, In-App Messaging (BETA), Predictions, and Remote Config.

6. How Popular Is Firebase?

Firebase enjoys relative popularity in several industries, namely, art & entertainment, computer electronics & technology, and travel & tourism. Leading high traffic websites such as Flipkart, Quora, and Worldstar use Firebase, while Accenture, Instacart, and Twitch use it as part of their tech stack.

7. What Is The Cost Of Firebase For Monitoring App Performance?

It’s currently free on both plans.

8. Should You Try Using Firebase On Your Own?

No, the Firebase SDKs require experienced developers to make them work properly. We recommend that you read up on the pitfalls of developing apps for free or going it alone. Developing, testing, and marketing apps is best left to the experts. It’s paramount to have a solid background in several frameworks, programming languages, markup languages, and software development paradigms. First-timers and novice developers lack this deep understanding, which will put their projects at risk.

9. What Does Firebase Integrate With?

Firebase offers key integrations with AdMob, BigQuery, Data Studio, Google App Campaigns, Google Marketing Platform, Jira, PagerDuty, Play Store, and Slack. Furthermore, it integrates with popular frameworks such as AngularJS, Flutter, and React. Consider if you’ll be using any of the above integrations during your cost of Firebase analysis.

10. Is Firebase Right For Your Project?

Though Firebase started as a messaging API for mobile and web apps, it’s primarily aimed at developers seeking easy and reliable integration with the Google Cloud Platform (GCP). So, if you rely exclusively on Google’s back-end infrastructure for your upcoming app, then Firebase is an apt choice. You’ll need to register for a GCP account, which will give you access to Firebase and Google Maps API. Google does offer a 90-day trial with $ 300 credit to help you get started.

Many developers choose Firebase mainly for its analytics and authentication components. But its other SDKs do integrate easily and make it possible to scale an app when necessary. Furthermore, recent enhancements to Firebase make it feasible as a cost-effective and robust serverless solution.

However, we need to offer a word of warning before using Firebase. In 2019, Google shut down Google Analytics for mobile apps and encouraged developers to use Firebase Analytics instead. Unfortunately, it wasn’t an easy switch since Firebase isn’t as straightforward as many developers had hoped. That’s why we recommend that you consider alternatives, such as Kumalos Mobile App Analytics, which powers a plethora of apps developed by NS804.

The Bottom Line

So, how much does Firebase cost? Free if you’re starting a small or hobby project. But expect costs to rise significantly, especially for medium to large applications that garner thousands and millions of downloads.

But should you use it? Well, that depends on how well you get on with Firebase’s various SDKs. If you need a more straightforward solution with powerful tools, then consider alternatives, such as Kumalos. Contact us today to learn how NS804 can develop your upcoming app, with all the necessary integrations to make it shine!

Boost Enterprise App Productivity With Offline Access

Building a compelling enterprise app can be tricky. It should run well under a wide range of scenarios, even when Internet access isn’t a given. Nowadays, company employees require a seamless online and offline experience in their apps to retain a productive workflow. That’s why every good developer should rise to the occasion by creating applications that have useful offline modes. Below, we provide several pointers on how you should implement offline access for your upcoming app.

1. Using An Enterprise App Anywhere

Developers go out of their way to support as many platforms as possible. Without a doubt, this is a smart move, as it maximizes the reach of their applications. Some users access apps via their desktops, while others prefer to use their mobile devices. But it doesn’t end there, as there’s a growing number of applications developed for the web.

If you’re embarking on enterprise app development, then you’ll want to follow a multiplatform strategy. After all, a company’s employees utilize a plethora of devices during their day-to-day work. But it’s vital to take things a step further by allowing for offline access. There’s nothing worse than for employees to have their work interrupted while the Internet’s down or when encountering connectivity issues.

2. Offline Access Is A Necessity

Even if your app’s online features are indispensable, always have a backup plan for when Internet access is unavailable. Furthermore, design your app to function when the Internet’s slow or when users experience connectivity issues.

Your enterprise app development strategy should encompass what apps company employees use throughout their day and how they use them. For example, some employees may need to make changes to data when offline. Developing the enterprise app with an offline-first design methodology means that it won’t need to access the backend server to implement these data changes.

Also, consider the many benefits that building an offline app brings to the table. Users prefer to retain apps on their mobile phones that have offline functionality. Offline apps load faster and use less battery than their online counterparts, which most millennials appreciate. Furthermore, users located in regions with slow or no access to the Internet can actually use your offline apps, giving you an edge over competitors that don’t have this feature.

3. Choosing Which Features To Offer Offline

During the enterprise app development process, you’ll need to prioritize certain features over others. And this is especially true when deciding what features must run consistently during your app’s offline mode. Making the correct design decisions can make or break your app, so choose wisely. Focus on mission-critical features essential to the smooth operation of the enterprise. Furthermore, study employee workflows carefully to determine what features serve them best.

If you’re developing e-commerce, file upload, money transfer, news, and on-demand delivery apps, then you should implement robust offline modes. When users lose Internet access, allow your apps to store mission-critical data offline. And when they gain access again, the apps will automatically complete or queue up all transactions and file transfers.

4. Handling A Push Notification App With Offline Use

When mobile users are offline, they won’t receive your push notifications. And this is unfortunate, as these notifications can help retain your existing app users. That’s why you’ll need to develop your push notification app with offline use in mind. Utilize a versatile analytics platform, such as Kumalos, which allows you to analyze how users engage with your app. By studying user data, you can carefully craft and schedule your push notifications so that they’re engaging and meaningful.

Alternatively, save user device information and whether or not they’re online in a server-side database. Detect when users get back online and run an automated request on your server to deliver the relevant push notifications they missed while offline.

5. Reduce Enterprise App Frustrations

Users expect apps to run flawlessly, especially in an enterprise environment. While they can put up with the odd bug that will be fixed in the next update, they don’t like dealing with apps that break entirely or slow them down. Don’t allow company employees to miss important deadlines because your app can’t perform specific tasks offline.

Communicate what features users can access while offline through the User Interface (UI). Moreover, make it easy for users to quickly see what functionality they have available without breaking their workflow. Apart from updates, ensure that your push notification app delivers the latest notifications that users missed out on earlier.

6. Decide How Much Users Can Store Locally

Nowadays, most smartphones come with a generous amount of storage space. But this doesn’t mean that all that space is available for your enterprise app development projects. Most users store documents, music, and videos that eat up much of their smartphones’ available storage.

When building your upcoming app with offline functionality, ensure that you only store essential data locally. If you’re developing an e-commerce app, store the most popular products offline for users to peruse. And if you’re creating a money transfer app, keep details of the recipient on the phone until completion of the transaction.

7. Saving The Current State When Suddenly Going Offline

Internet outages often happen when you least expect them. So make sure that your enterprise app saves the current state during such a scenario. Implement a dynamic or static cache, or even both, depending on the type of data your app handles. Data that’s updated regularly is stored in the dynamic cache, while data that doesn’t change often gets stored in the static cache.

Many apps utilize real-time data synchronization, which works well when online but not ideal when offline. However, there are workarounds, such as implementing modern synchronization protocols that facilitate specific data updates during offline mode. Do keep in mind that data synchronization comes with its own set of challenges. Too much syncing will drain a device’s battery quickly, whereas too little syncing increases the risk of losing data and missing important updates.

8. Create A Seamless Online And Offline Enterprise App Experience

Take a look at some of the best and most-used apps, and ask yourself what they have in common? Whether it’s Google Maps, Netflix, or Spotify, all these applications provide users with excellent offline modes. Users feel confident using these apps because they offer a stable and seamless experience both online and offline.

Focus your efforts on unifying both the online and offline aspects of your app. And don’t skimp on the User Interface (UI) & User Experience (UX) either, as you’ll need a consistent look and feel for its entirety. Your users should never feel like they’re using a completely different application when they go offline. Instead, they should enjoy using your app both online and offline regularly.

Final Thoughts

Several of the most successful and widely-used applications function flawlessly when online and offline. While there are many challenges in developing apps that provide a seamless experience, it’s worth the effort to meet and surpass user expectations. Contact us today to find out how NS804 can help you develop engaging apps with powerful offline features.